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Sustainability

Covers systems and practices that retain economic, environmental or social viability over time.

Sustainable UA: Gardening, March 10, 2010

Sustainable UA Monthly Meeting
Wednesday, March 10
7 p.m.
Covenant Presbyterian Church (corner of Ridgecliff and Redding, Upper Arlington)
Speakers:
Bob Tannehill, garden manager for Covenant Presbyterian Church community garden, "Seeds of Hope"

Jim Fronk, UA teacher, learning garden at Tremont Elementary

Update on UA green efforts April 14, 2010

Sustainable Upper Arlington
Monthly meeting

Wednesday, April 14

6:45-9 p.m.,

Municipal Services Center, Tremont Road.

Topics: Green Roads, community rain garden at SUNY 95 Park, Kingsdale project.

http://sustainableupperarlington.org/ or sustainableua@live.com.

Community Vegetable Garden April 10, 17, 24

Community Vegetable Garden Project
Volunteer to prepare 5 plots

Saturday, April 10, 17 and 24

Tremont Elementary School, 2900 Tremont Road, Upper Arlington, Ohio

Join students, teachers, and parents in building a 5-plot community vegetable garden. The garden will provide multiple learning opportunities. All produce will be donated to food pantries.

For schedule and information, contact: tremontgrowingtogether@gmail.com

Join UAPA this Saturday for Coffee and Conversation at Le Chatelaine!

Coffee and Conversation

We are back....at Le Chatelaine that is....where the eggs are yummy, the atmosphere is cozy and the conversation is invigorating. Please join us this Saturday morning, June 4th from 9:00 to 10:30. The group, Sustainable UA, will be our special guest. Find out the "green" possibilities in our backyard.

 

A SB5 petition will be available to sign.

We hope to see you Saturday at Le Chatelaine, 1550 West Lane Avenue.

 

 

 

Help us end farm animal abuse

The cruelty is shocking. Unspeakable. So brutal that it has sparked outrage, anger, and action worldwide.

Last week Mercy For Animals released heartbreaking footage of malicious and sadistic abuse to cows and calves at a Central Ohio dairy farm. Workers were captured on film violently stabbing cows with pitchforks, mercilessly beating them in the face with crowbars, and punching, kicking, and body-slamming baby calves.

 

The agriculture industry wants you to believe this is an isolated incident. But it's not.

On factory farms, animals regularly live out their short lives in confinement so extreme that they can't stand up, turn around, stretch their limbs, or lie down comfortably. It's an industry where abuse has become normal.

And Ohio is among the worst. Only four states in this country have weaker animal protection laws than Ohio.

You don't have to be an animal advocate, much less a vegetarian, to want to reform the way we raise our farm animals in Ohio. All it takes is a modicum of compassion and the acknowledgment that animals should not endure unnecessary trauma or abuse while in our care.

Take action now

Here's what you can do:

  1. Sign the petition and join the more than 30,000 Change.org members who have already taken action to demand that those involved in the Conklin Dairy abuse case are brought to justice.
  2. Volunteer to gather signatures by attending a ballot signature gathering event. Deadline is June 30, 2010 to get 600,000 petition signatures to the Secretary of State.
  3. Donate to Ohioans for Humane Farms: your donation will help get the signatures needed for the ballot initiative

Obama's "A New Foundation" Speech

Conservative op-ed columnist David Brooks reviewed Obama's speech:

America once had a responsible economic culture, Obama argued. People used to save their pennies to buy their dream houses. Banks used to lend by “traditional standards.” Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac used to stick to their “traditional mandate.” Companies like A.I.G. used to limit themselves to the “traditional insurance business.”

Kingsdale: Thinking Outside the Big Box

Progressive viewpoint:

To better the quality of life for Upper Arlington residents, the city must carefully guide the development of commercial and industrial property. Progressives want to increase revenue from commercial property, to keep property taxes down. The way to reach the goal is through careful planning and implementation, as well as actively seeking innovative partnerships with the private sector. It will not be achieved by passively waiting for new, unwise development to enrich the city.

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